TITLE 23 - US CODE - CHAPTER 4 - HIGHWAY SAFETY

23 USC 401 - Authority of the Secretary

The Secretary is authorized and directed to assist and cooperate with other Federal departments and agencies, State and local governments, private industry, and other interested parties, to increase highway safety. For the purposes of this chapter, the term State means any one of the fifty States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.

23 USC 402 - Highway safety programs

(a) Each State shall have a highway safety program approved by the Secretary, designed to reduce traffic accidents and deaths, injuries, and property damage resulting therefrom. Such programs shall be in accordance with uniform guidelines promulgated by the Secretary. Such uniform guidelines shall be expressed in terms of performance criteria. In addition, such uniform guidelines shall include programs
(1)  to reduce injuries and deaths resulting from motor vehicles being driven in excess of posted speed limits,
(2)  to encourage the proper use of occupant protection devices (including the use of safety belts and child restraint systems) by occupants of motor vehicles,
(3)  to reduce deaths and injuries resulting from persons driving motor vehicles while impaired by alcohol or a controlled substance,
(4)  to prevent accidents and reduce deaths and injuries resulting from accidents involving motor vehicles and motorcycles,
(5)  to reduce injuries and deaths resulting from accidents involving school buses, and[1]
(6)  to reduce accidents resulting from unsafe driving behavior (including aggressive or fatigued driving and distracted driving arising from the use of electronic devices in vehicles)[2]
(7)  to improve law enforcement services in motor vehicle accident prevention, traffic supervision, and post-accident procedures. The Secretary shall establish a highway safety program for the collection and reporting of data on traffic-related deaths and injuries by the States. Under such program, the States shall collect and report such data as the Secretary may require. The purposes of the program are to ensure national uniform data on such deaths and injuries and to allow the Secretary to make determinations for use in developing programs to reduce such deaths and injuries and making recommendations to Congress concerning legislation necessary to implement such programs. The program shall provide for annual reports to the Secretary on the efforts being made by the States in reducing deaths and injuries occurring at highway construction sites and the effectiveness and results of such efforts. The Secretary shall establish minimum reporting criteria for the program. Such criteria shall include, but not be limited to, criteria on deaths and injuries resulting from police pursuits, school bus accidents, aggressive driving, fatigued driving, distracted driving, and speeding, on traffic-related deaths and injuries at highway construction sites and on the configuration of commercial motor vehicles involved in motor vehicle accidents. Such uniform guidelines shall be promulgated by the Secretary so as to improve driver performance (including, but not limited to, driver education, driver testing to determine proficiency to operate motor vehicles, driver examinations (both physical and mental) and driver licensing) and to improve pedestrian performance and bicycle safety. In addition such uniform guidelines shall include, but not be limited to, provisions for an effective record system of accidents (including injuries and deaths resulting therefrom), accident investigations to determine the probable causes of accidents, injuries, and deaths, vehicle registration, operation, and inspection, highway design and maintenance (including lighting, markings, and surface treatment), traffic control, vehicle codes and laws, surveillance of traffic for detection and correction of high or potentially high accident locations, enforcement of light transmission standards of window glazing for passenger motor vehicles and light trucks as necessary to improve highway safety, and emergency services. Such guidelines as are applicable to State highway safety programs shall, to the extent determined appropriate by the Secretary, be applicable to federally administered areas where a Federal department or agency controls the highways or supervises traffic operations.
(b) Administration of State Programs.— 

(1) Administrative requirements.— 
The Secretary may not approve a State highway safety program under this section which does not
(A) provide that the Governor of the State shall be responsible for the administration of the program through a State highway safety agency which shall have adequate powers and be suitably equipped and organized to carry out, to the satisfaction of the Secretary, such program;
(B) authorize political subdivisions of the State to carry out local highway safety programs within their jurisdictions as a part of the State highway safety program if such local highway safety programs are approved by the Governor and are in accordance with the minimum standards established by the Secretary under this section;
(C) except as provided in paragraph (3), provide that at least 40 percent of all Federal funds apportioned under this section to the State for any fiscal year will be expended by the political subdivisions of the State, including Indian tribal governments, in carrying out local highway safety programs authorized in accordance with subparagraph (B);
(D) provide adequate and reasonable access for the safe and convenient movement of individuals with disabilities, including those in wheelchairs, across curbs constructed or replaced on or after July 1, 1976, at all pedestrian crosswalks throughout the State; and
(E) provide satisfactory assurances that the State will implement activities in support of national highway safety goals to reduce motor vehicle related fatalities that also reflect the primary data-related crash factors within a State as identified by the State highway safety planning process, including
(i) national law enforcement mobilizations;
(ii) sustained enforcement of statutes addressing impaired driving, occupant protection, and driving in excess of posted speed limits;
(iii) an annual statewide safety belt use survey in accordance with criteria established by the Secretary for the measurement of State safety belt use rates to ensure that the measurements are accurate and representative; and
(iv) development of statewide data systems to provide timely and effective data analysis to support allocation of highway safety resources.
(2) Waiver.— 
The Secretary may waive the requirement of paragraph (1)(C), in whole or in part, for a fiscal year for any State whenever the Secretary determines that there is an insufficient number of local highway safety programs to justify the expenditure in the State of such percentage of Federal funds during the fiscal year.
(3) Use of technology for traffic enforcement.— 
The Secretary may encourage States to use technologically advanced traffic enforcement devices (including the use of automatic speed detection devices such as photo-radar) by law enforcement officers.
(c) Funds authorized to be appropriated to carry out this section shall be used to aid the States to conduct the highway safety programs approved in accordance with subsection (a), including development and implementation of manpower training programs, and of demonstration programs that the Secretary determines will contribute directly to the reduction of accidents, and deaths and injuries resulting therefrom. Such funds shall be apportioned 75 per centum in the ratio which the population of each State bears to the total population of all the States, as shown by the latest available Federal census, and 25 per centum in the ratio which the public road mileage in each State bears to the total public road mileage in all States. For the purposes of this subsection, a public road means any road under the jurisdiction of and maintained by a public authority and open to public travel. Public road mileage as used in this subsection shall be determined as of the end of the calendar year preceding the year in which the funds are apportioned and shall be certified to by the Governor of the State and subject to approval by the Secretary. The annual apportionment to each State shall not be less than one-half of 1 per centum of the total apportionment, except that the apportionment to the Secretary of the Interior shall not be less than 2 percent of the total apportionment and the apportionments to the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands shall not be less than one-quarter of 1 per centum of the total apportionment. The Secretary shall not apportion any funds under this subsection to any State which is not implementing a highway safety program approved by the Secretary in accordance with this section. For the purpose of the seventh sentence of this subsection, a highway safety program approved by the Secretary shall not include any requirement that a State implement such a program by adopting or enforcing any law, rule, or regulation based on a guideline promulgated by the Secretary under this section requiring any motorcycle operator eighteen years of age or older or passenger eighteen years of age or older to wear a safety helmet when operating or riding a motorcycle on the streets and highways of that State. Implementation of a highway safety program under this section shall not be construed to require the Secretary to require compliance with every uniform guideline, or with every element of every uniform guideline, in every State. Funds apportioned under this section to any State, that does not have a highway safety program approved by the Secretary or that is not implementing an approved program, shall be reduced by amounts equal to not less than 50 per centum of the amounts that would otherwise be apportioned to the State under this section, until such time as the Secretary approves such program or determines that the State is implementing an approved program, as appropriate. The Secretary shall consider the gravity of the States failure to have or implement an approved program in determining the amount of the reduction. The Secretary shall promptly apportion to the State the funds withheld from its apportionment if he approves the States highway safety program or determines that the State has begun implementing an approved program, as appropriate, prior to the end of the fiscal year for which the funds were withheld. If the Secretary determines that the State did not correct its failure within such period, the Secretary shall reapportion the withheld funds to the other States in accordance with the formula specified in this subsection not later than 30 days after such determination.
(d) All provisions of chapter 1 of this title that are applicable to National Highway System highway funds other than provisions relating to the apportionment formula and provisions limiting the expenditure of such funds to the Federal-aid systems, shall apply to the highway safety funds authorized to be appropriated to carry out this section, except as determined by the Secretary to be inconsistent with this section, and except that the aggregate of all expenditures made during any fiscal year by a State and its political subdivisions (exclusive of Federal funds) for carrying out the State highway safety program (other than planning and administration) shall be available for the purpose of crediting such State during such fiscal year for the non-Federal share of the cost of any project under this section (other than one for planning or administration) without regard to whether such expenditures were actually made in connection with such project and except that, in the case of a local highway safety program carried out by an Indian tribe, if the Secretary is satisfied that an Indian tribe does not have sufficient funds available to meet the non-Federal share of the cost of such program, he may increase the Federal share of the cost thereof payable under this Act to the extent necessary. In applying such provisions of chapter 1 in carrying out this section the term State transportation department as used in such provisions shall mean the Governor of a State for the purposes of this section.
(e) Uniform guidelines promulgated by the Secretary to carry out this section shall be developed in cooperation with the States, their political subdivisions, appropriate Federal departments and agencies, and such other public and private organizations as the Secretary deems appropriate.
(f) The Secretary may make arrangements with other Federal departments and agencies for assistance in the preparation of uniform guidelines for the highway safety programs contemplated by subsection (a) and in the administration of such programs. Such departments and agencies are directed to cooperate in such preparation and administration, on a reimbursable basis.
(g) Nothing in this section authorizes the appropriation or expenditure of funds for
(1)  highway construction, maintenance, or design (other than design of safety features of highways to be incorporated into guidelines) or
(2)  any purpose for which funds are authorized by section 403 of this title.
[(h) Repealed. Pub. L. 97–35, title XI, § 1107(c), Aug. 13, 1981, 95 Stat. 626.]
(i) Application in Indian Country.— 

(1) Use of terms.— 
For the purpose of application of this section in Indian country, the terms State and Governor of a State include the Secretary of the Interior and the term political subdivision of a State includes an Indian tribe.
(2) Expenditures for local highway programs.— 
Notwithstanding subsection (b)(1)(C), 95 percent of the funds apportioned to the Secretary of the Interior under this section shall be expended by Indian tribes to carry out highway safety programs within their jurisdictions.
(3) Access for individuals with disabilities.— 
The requirements of subsection (b)(1)(D) shall be applicable to Indian tribes, except to those tribes with respect to which the Secretary determines that application of such provisions would not be practicable.
(4) Indian country defined.— 
In this subsection, the term Indian country means
(A) all land within the limits of any Indian reservation under the jurisdiction of the United States, notwithstanding the issuance of any patent and including rights-of-way running through the reservation;
(B) all dependent Indian communities within the borders of the United States, whether within the original or subsequently acquired territory thereof and whether within or without the limits of a State; and
(C) all Indian allotments, the Indian titles to which have not been extinguished, including rights-of-way running through such allotments.
(j) Rulemaking Proceeding.— 
The Secretary may periodically conduct a rulemaking process to identify highway safety programs that are highly effective in reducing motor vehicle crashes, injuries, and deaths. Any such rulemaking shall take into account the major role of the States in implementing such programs. When a rule promulgated in accordance with this section takes effect, States shall consider these highly effective programs when developing their highway safety programs.
(k) 
(1) Subject to the provisions of this subsection, the Secretary shall make a grant to any State which includes, as part of its highway safety program under section 402 of this title, the use of a comprehensive computerized safety recordkeeping system designed to correlate data regarding traffic accidents, drivers, motor vehicles, and roadways. Any such grant may only be used by such State to establish and maintain a comprehensive computerized traffic safety recordkeeping system or to obtain and operate components to support highway safety priority programs identified by the Secretary under this section. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, if a report, list, schedule, or survey is prepared by or for a State or political subdivision thereof under this subsection, such report, list, schedule, or survey shall not be admitted as evidence or used in any suit or action for damages arising out of any matter mentioned in such report, list, schedule, or survey.
(2) No State may receive a grant under this subsection in more than two fiscal years.
(3) The amount of the grant to any State under this subsection for the first fiscal year such State is eligible for a grant under this subsection shall equal 10 per centum of the amount apportioned to such State for fiscal year 1985 under this section. The amount of a grant to any State under this subsection for the second fiscal year such State is eligible for a grant under this subsection shall equal 10 per centum of the amount apportioned to such State for fiscal year 1986 under this section.
(4) A State is eligible for a grant under this subsection if
(A) it certifies to the Secretary that it has in operation a computerized traffic safety recordkeeping system and identifies proposed means of upgrading the system acceptable to the Secretary; or
(B) it provides to the Secretary a plan acceptable to the Secretary for establishing and maintaining a computerized traffic safety recordkeeping system.
(5) The Secretary, after making the deduction authorized by the second sentence of subsection (c) of this section for fiscal years 1985 and 1986, shall set aside 10 per centum of the remaining funds authorized to be appropriated to carry out this section for the purpose of making grants under this subsection. Funds set aside under this subsection shall remain available for the fiscal year authorized and for the succeeding fiscal year and any amounts remaining unexpended at the end of such period shall be apportioned in accordance with the provisions of subsection (c) of this section.
(l) Law Enforcement Vehicular Pursuit Training.— 
A State shall actively encourage all relevant law enforcement agencies in such State to follow the guidelines established for vehicular pursuits issued by the International Association of Chiefs of Police that are in effect on the date of enactment of this subsection or as revised and in effect after such date as determined by the Secretary.
(m) Consolidation of Grant Applications.— 
The Secretary shall establish an approval process by which a State may apply for all grants under this chapter through a single application process with one annual deadline. The Bureau of Indian Affairs shall establish a similar simplified process for applications for grants from Indian tribes under this chapter.
[1] So in original. The word “and” probably should not appear.
[2] So in original. Probably should be followed by “and”.

23 USC 403 - Highway safety research and development

(a) Authority of the Secretary.— 
The Secretary is authorized to use funds appropriated to carry out this section to
(1) conduct research on all phases of highway safety and traffic conditions, including accident causation, highway or driver characteristics, communications, and emergency care;
(2) conduct ongoing research into driver behavior and its effect on traffic safety;
(3) conduct research on, launch initiatives to counter, and conduct demonstration projects on fatigued driving by drivers of motor vehicles and distracted driving in such vehicles, including the effect that the use of electronic devices and other factors deemed relevant by the Secretary have on driving;
(4) conduct training or education programs in cooperation with other Federal departments and agencies, States, private sector persons, highway safety personnel, and law enforcement personnel;
(5) conduct research on, and evaluate the effectiveness of, traffic safety countermeasures, including seat belts and impaired driving initiatives;
(6) conduct research on, evaluate, and develop best practices related to driver education programs (including driver education curricula, instructor training and certification, program administration and delivery mechanisms) and make recommendations for harmonizing driver education and multistage graduated licensing systems;
(7) conduct research, training, and education programs related to older drivers;
(8) conduct demonstration projects; and
(9) conduct research, training, and programs relating to motorcycle safety, including impaired driving.
(b) Drugs and Driver Behavior.— 
In addition to the research authorized by subsection (a), the Secretary, in consultation with other Government and private agencies as may be necessary, is authorized to carry out safety research on the following:
(1) The relationship between the consumption and use of drugs and their effect upon highway safety and drivers of motor vehicles.
(2) Driver behavior research, including the characteristics of driver performance, the relationships of mental and physical abilities or disabilities to the driving task, and the relationship of frequency of driver crash involvement to highway safety.
(3) Measures that may deter drugged driving.
(4) Programs to train law enforcement officers on motor vehicle pursuits conducted by the officers.
(5) Technology to detect drug use and enable States to efficiently process toxicology evidence.
(6) Research on the effects of illicit drugs and the compound effects of alcohol and illicit drugs on impairment.
(c) The research authorized by subsections (a) and (b) of this section may be conducted by the Secretary through grants and contracts with public and private agencies, institutions, and individuals.
(d) The Secretary may, where he deems it to be in furtherance of the purposes of section 402 of this title, vest in State or local agencies, on such terms and conditions as he deems appropriate, title to equipment purchased for demonstration projects with funds authorized by this section.
(e) In addition to the research authorized by subsection (a) of this section, the Secretary shall, either independently or in cooperation with other Federal departments or agencies, conduct research into, and make grants to or contracts with State or local agencies, institutions, and individuals for projects to demonstrate the administrative adjudication of traffic infractions. Such administrative adjudication demonstration projects shall be designed to improve highway safety by developing fair, efficient, and effective processes and procedures for traffic infraction adjudication, utilizing appropriate punishment, training, and rehabilitative measures for traffic offenders. The Secretary shall report to Congress by July 1, 1975, and each year thereafter during the continuance of the program, on the research and demonstration projects authorized by this subsection, and shall include in such report a comparison of the fairness, efficiency, and effectiveness of administrative adjudication of traffic infractions with other methods of handling such infractions.
(f) Collaborative Research and Development.— 

(1) In general.— 
For the purpose of encouraging innovative solutions to highway safety problems, stimulating voluntary improvements in highway safety, and stimulating the marketing of new highway safety-related technology by private industry, the Secretary is authorized to undertake, on a cost-shared basis, collaborative research and development with non-Federal entities, including State and local governments, colleges, and universities and corporations, partnerships, sole proprietorships, and trade associations that are incorporated or established under the laws of any State or the United States. This collaborative research may include crash data collection and analysis; driver and pedestrian behavior; and demonstrations of technology.
(2) Cooperative agreements.— 
In carrying out this subsection, the Secretary may enter into cooperative research and development agreements, as defined in section 12 of the Stevenson-Wydler Technology Innovation Act of 1980 (15 U.S.C. 3710a); except that in entering into such agreements, the Secretary may agree to provide not more than 50 percent of the cost of any research or development project selected by the Secretary under this subsection.
(3) Project selection.— 
In selecting projects to be conducted under this subsection, the Secretary shall establish a procedure to consider the views of experts and the public concerning the project areas.
(4) Applicability of stevenson-wydler technology innovation act.— 
The research, development, or utilization of any technology pursuant to an agreement under the provisions of this subsection, including the terms under which technology may be licensed and the resulting royalties may be distributed, shall be subject to the provisions of the Stevenson-Wydler Technology Innovation Act of 1980.
(g) International Cooperation.— 
The Administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration may participate and cooperate in international activities to enhance highway safety.

23 USC 404 - National Highway Safety Advisory Committee

(a) 
(1) There is established in the Department of Transportation a National Highway Safety Advisory Committee, composed of the Secretary or an officer of the Department appointed by him, the Federal Highway Administrator, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administrator, and thirty-five members appointed by the President, no more than four of whom shall be Federal officers or employees. The Secretary shall select the Chairman of the Committee from among the Committee members. The appointed members, having due regard for the purposes of this chapter, shall be selected from among representatives of various State and local governments, including State legislatures, of public and private interests contributing to, affected by, or concerned with highway safety, including the national organizations of passenger car, bus, and truck owners, and of other public and private agencies, organizations, or groups demonstrating an active interest in highway safety, as well as research scientists and other individuals who are expert in this field.
(2) 
(A) Each member appointed by the President shall hold office for a term of three years, except that
(i)  any member appointed to fill a vacancy occurring prior to the expiration of the term for which his predecessor was appointed shall be appointed for the remainder of such term, and
(ii)  the terms of office of members first taking office after the date of enactment of this section shall expire as follows: Twelve at the end of one year after the date such committee members are appointed by the President, twelve at the end of two years after the date such committee members are appointed by the President, and eleven at the end of three years after the date such committee members are appointed, as designated by the President at the time of appointment, and
(iii)  the term of any member shall be extended until the date on which the successors appointment is effective. None of the members appointed by the President who has served a three-year term, other than Federal officers or employees, shall be eligible for reappointment within one year following the end of his preceding term.
(B) Members of the Committee who are not officers or employees of the United States shall, while attending meetings or conferences of such Committee or otherwise engaged in the business of such Committee, be entitled to receive compensation at a rate fixed by the Secretary, but not exceeding $100 per diem, including traveltime, and while away from their homes or regular places of business they may be allowed travel expenses, including per diem in lieu of subsistence, as authorized in section 5 of the Administrative Expenses Act of 1946 (5 U.S.C. 73b–2) for persons in the Government service employed intermittently. Payments under this section shall not render members of the Committee employees or officials of the United States for any purpose.
(b) The National Highway Safety Advisory Committee shall advise, consult with, and make recommendations to, the Secretary on matters relating to the activities and functions of the Department in the field of highway safety. The Committee is authorized
(1)  to review research projects or programs submitted to or recommended by it in the field of highway safety and recommend to the Secretary, for prosecution under this title, any such projects which it believes show promise of making valuable contributions to human knowledge with respect to the cause and prevention of highway accidents; and
(2)  to review, prior to issuance, standards proposed to be issued by order of the Secretary under the provisions of section 402 (a) of this title and to make recommendations thereon. Such recommendations shall be published in connection with the Secretarys determination or order.
(c) The National Highway Safety Advisory Committee shall meet from time to time as the Secretary shall direct, but at least once each year.
(d) The Secretary shall provide to the National Highway Safety Committee from among the personnel and facilities of the Department of Transportation such staff and facilities as are necessary to carry out the functions of such Committee.

23 USC 405 - Occupant protection incentive grants

(a) General Authority.— 

(1) Authority to make grants.— 
Subject to the requirements of this section, the Secretary shall make grants under this section to States that adopt and implement effective programs to reduce highway deaths and injuries resulting from individuals riding unrestrained or improperly restrained in motor vehicles. Such grants may be used by recipient States only to implement and enforce, as appropriate, such programs.
(2) Maintenance of effort.— 
No grant may be made to a State under this section in any fiscal year unless the State enters into such agreements with the Secretary as the Secretary may require to ensure that the State will maintain its aggregate expenditures from all other sources for programs described in paragraph (1) at or above the average level of such expenditures in its 2 fiscal years preceding the date of enactment of the SAFETEALU.
(3) Maximum period of eligibility.— 
No State may receive grants under this section in more than 6 fiscal years beginning after September 30, 2003.
(4) Federal share.— 
The Federal share of the cost of implementing and enforcing, as appropriate, in a fiscal year a program adopted by a State pursuant to paragraph (1) shall not exceed
(A) in each of the first and second fiscal years beginning after September 30, 2003, in which the State receives a grant under this section, 75 percent;
(B) in each of the third and fourth fiscal years beginning after September 30, 2003, in which the State receives a grant under this section, 50 percent; and
(C) in each of the fifth and sixth fiscal years beginning after September 30, 2003, in which the State receives a grant under this section, 25 percent.
(b) Grant Eligibility.— 
A State shall become eligible for a grant under this section by adopting or demonstrating to the satisfaction of the Secretary at least 4 of the following:
(1) Safety belt use law.— 
The State has in effect a safety belt use law that makes unlawful throughout the State the operation of a passenger motor vehicle whenever an individual (other than a child who is secured in a child restraint system) in the front seat of the vehicle (and, beginning in fiscal year 2001, in any seat in the vehicle) does not have a safety belt properly secured about the individuals body.
(2) Primary safety belt use law.— 
The State provides for primary enforcement of the safety belt use law of the State.
(3) Minimum fine or penalty points.— 
The State imposes a minimum fine or provides for the imposition of penalty points against the drivers license of an individual
(A) for a violation of the safety belt use law of the State; and
(B) for a violation of the child passenger protection law of the State.
(4) Special traffic enforcement program.— 
The State has implemented a statewide special traffic enforcement program for occupant protection that emphasizes publicity for the program.
(5) Child passenger protection education program.— 
The State has implemented a statewide comprehensive child passenger protection education program that includes education programs about proper seating positions for children in air bag equipped motor vehicles and instruction on how to reduce the improper use of child restraint systems.
(6) Child passenger protection law.— 
The State has in effect a law that requires minors who are riding in a passenger motor vehicle to be properly secured in a child safety seat or other appropriate restraint system.
(c) Grant Amounts.— 
The amount of a grant for which a State qualifies under this section for a fiscal year shall equal up to 100 percent of the amount apportioned to the State for fiscal year 2003 under section 402.
[(d) Repealed. Pub. L. 109–59, title II, § 2002(e), Aug. 10, 2005, 119 Stat. 1522.]
(e) Applicability of Chapter 1.— 
The provisions contained in section 402 (d) shall apply to this section.
(f) Definitions.— 
In this section, the following definitions apply:
(1) Child safety seat.— 
The term child safety seat means any device (except safety belts) designed for use in a motor vehicle to restrain, seat, or position a child who weighs 50 pounds or less.
(2) Motor vehicle.— 
The term motor vehicle means a vehicle driven or drawn by mechanical power and manufactured primarily for use on public streets, roads, and highways, but does not include a vehicle operated only on a rail line.
(3) Multipurpose passenger vehicle.— 
The term multipurpose passenger vehicle means a motor vehicle with motive power (except a trailer), designed to carry not more than 10 individuals, that is constructed either on a truck chassis or with special features for occasional off-road operation.
(4) Passenger car.— 
The term passenger car means a motor vehicle with motive power (except a multipurpose passenger vehicle, motorcycle, or trailer) designed to carry not more than 10 individuals.
(5) Passenger motor vehicle.— 
The term passenger motor vehicle means a passenger car or a multipurpose passenger motor vehicle.
(6) Safety belt.— 
The term safety belt means
(A) with respect to open-body passenger vehicles, including convertibles, an occupant restraint system consisting of a lap belt or a lap belt and a detachable shoulder belt; and
(B) with respect to other passenger vehicles, an occupant restraint system consisting of integrated lap and shoulder belts.

23 USC 406 - Safety belt performance grants

(a) In General.— 
The Secretary shall make grants to States in accordance with the provisions of this section to encourage the enactment and enforcement of laws requiring the use of safety belts in passenger motor vehicles.
(b) Grants for Enacting Primary Safety Belt Use Laws.— 

(1) In general.— 
The Secretary shall make a single grant to each State that either
(A) enacts for the first time after December 31, 2002, and has in effect and is enforcing a conforming primary safety belt use law for all passenger motor vehicles; or
(B) in the case of a State that does not have such a primary safety belt use law, has after December 31, 2005, a State safety belt use rate of 85 percent or more for each of the 2 calendar years immediately preceding the fiscal year of a grant, as measured under criteria determined by the Secretary.
(2) Amount.— 
The amount of a grant available to a State in fiscal year 2006 or in a subsequent fiscal year under paragraph (1) shall equal 475 percent of the amount apportioned to the State under section 402 (c) for fiscal year 2003.
(3) July 1 cut-off.— 
For the purpose of determining the eligibility of a State for a grant under paragraph (1)(A), a conforming primary safety belt use law enacted after June 30th of any year shall
(A) not be considered to have been enacted in the Federal fiscal year in which that June 30th falls; but
(B) be considered as if it were enacted after October 1 of the next Federal fiscal year.
(4) Shortfall.— 
If the total amount of grants provided for by this subsection for a fiscal year exceeds the amount of funds available for such grants for that fiscal year, the Secretary shall make grants under this subsection to States in the order in which
(A) the conforming primary safety belt use law came into effect; or
(B) the States safety belt use rate was 85 percent or more for 2 consecutive calendar years (as measured under by criteria determined by the Secretary), whichever first occurs.
(5) Catch-up grants.— 
The Secretary shall make a grant to any State eligible for a grant under this subsection that did not receive a grant for a fiscal year because of the application of paragraph (4), in the next fiscal year if the States conforming primary safety belt use law remains in effect or its safety belt use rate is 85 percent or more for the 2 consecutive calendar years preceding such next fiscal year (subject to the condition in paragraph (4)).
(c) Grants for Pre-2003 Laws.— 

(1) In general.— 
To the extent that amounts made available for grants under this section for any of fiscal years 2006 through 2009 exceed the total amount of grants to be awarded under subsection (b) for the fiscal year, including amounts to be awarded for catch-up grants under subsection (b)(5), the Secretary shall make a single grant to each State that enacted, has in effect, and is enforcing a conforming primary safety belt use law for all passenger motor vehicles that was in effect before January 1, 2003.
(2) Amount; installments.— 
The amount of a grant available to a State under this subsection shall be equal to 200 percent of the amount of funds apportioned to the State under section 402 (c) for fiscal year 2003. The Secretary may award the grant in annual installments.
(d) Allocation of Unallocated Funds.— 

(1) Additional grants.— 
The Secretary shall make additional grants under this section of any amounts made available for grants under this section that, on July 1, 2009, have not been allocated to States under this section.
(2) Allocation.— 
The additional grants made under this subsection shall be allocated among all States that, as of that date, have enacted, have in effect, and are enforcing conforming primary safety belt laws for all passenger motor vehicles. The allocations shall be made in accordance with the formula for apportioning funds among the States under section 402 (c).
(e) Use of Grant Funds.— 

(1) In general.— 
Subject to paragraph (2), a State may use a grant under this section for any safety purpose under this title or for any project that corrects or improves a hazardous roadway location or feature or proactively addresses highway safety problems, including
(A) intersection improvements;
(B) pavement and shoulder widening;
(C) installation of rumble strips and other warning devices;
(D) improving skid resistance;
(E) improvements for pedestrian or bicyclist safety;
(F) railway-highway crossing safety;
(G) traffic calming;
(H) the elimination of roadside obstacles;
(I) improving highway signage and pavement marking;
(J) installing priority control systems for emergency vehicles at signalized intersections;
(K) installing traffic control or warning devices at locations with high accident potential;
(L) safety-conscious planning; and
(M) improving crash data collection and analysis.
(2) Safety activity requirement.— 
Notwithstanding paragraph (1), the Secretary shall ensure that at least $1,000,000 of amounts received by States under this section are obligated for safety activities under this chapter.
(3) Support activity.— 
The Secretary or his designee may engage in activities with States and State legislators to consider proposals related to safety belt use laws.
(f) Carry-Forward of Excess Funds.— 
If the amount available for grants under this section for any fiscal year exceeds the sum of the grants made under this section for that fiscal year, the excess amount and obligational authority shall be carried forward and made available for grants under this section in the succeeding fiscal year.
(g) Federal Share.— 
The Federal share payable for grants under this section shall be 100 percent.
(h) Passenger Motor Vehicle Defined.— 
In this section, the term passenger motor vehicle means
(1) a passenger car;
(2) a pickup truck; and
(3) a van, minivan, or sport utility vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating of less than 10,000 pounds.

23 USC 407 - Innovative project grants

(a) In addition to other grants authorized by this chapter, the Secretary may make grants in any fiscal year to those States, political subdivisions thereof, and nonprofit organizations which develop innovative approaches to highway safety problems in accordance with criteria to be established by the Secretary in cooperation with the States, political subdivisions thereof, and such nonprofit organizations as the Secretary deems appropriate.
(b) The Secretary shall establish a procedure for the selection of grant applications submitted under this section. In developing such procedure, the Secretary shall consult with the States and political subdivisions thereof, appropriate Federal departments and agencies, and such other public and nonprofit organizations as the Secretary deems appropriate.
(c) Any State, political subdivision thereof, and nonprofit organization may make an application under this section to carry out an innovative project described in subsection (a) of this section. Such application shall be in such form and contain such information as the Secretary, by regulation, prescribes.
(d) Not to exceed 2 per centum of the funds authorized to be appropriated to carry out this section shall be available to the Secretary for the necessary costs of administering the provisions of this section.
(e) The Secretary shall submit an annual report to the Congress which provides a description of each application received for a grant under this section and an evaluation of innovative projects carried out with grants made under this section.

23 USC 408 - State traffic safety information system improvements

(a) Grant Authority.— 
Subject to the requirements of this section, the Secretary shall make grants to eligible States to support the development and implementation of effective programs by such States to
(1) improve the timeliness, accuracy, completeness, uniformity, integration, and accessibility of the safety data of the State that is needed to identify priorities for national, State, and local highway and traffic safety programs;
(2) evaluate the effectiveness of efforts to make such improvements;
(3) link the State data systems, including traffic records, with other data systems within the State, such as systems that contain medical, roadway, and economic data; and
(4) improve the compatibility and interoperability of the data systems of the State with national data systems and data systems of other States and enhance the ability of the Secretary to observe and analyze national trends in crash occurrences, rates, outcomes, and circumstances.
(b) First-Year Grants.— 
To be eligible for a first-year grant under this section in a fiscal year, a State shall demonstrate to the satisfaction of the Secretary that the State has
(1) established a highway safety data and traffic records coordinating committee with a multidisciplinary membership that includes, among others, managers, collectors, and users of traffic records and public health and injury control data systems; and
(2) developed a multiyear highway safety data and traffic records system strategic plan
(A) that addresses existing deficiencies in the States highway safety data and traffic records system;
(B) that is approved by the highway safety data and traffic records coordinating committee;
(C) that specifies how existing deficiencies in the States highway safety data and traffic records system were identified;
(D) that prioritizes, on the basis of the identified highway safety data and traffic records system deficiencies of the State, the highway safety data and traffic records system needs and goals of the State, including the activities under subsection (a);
(E) that identifies performance-based measures by which progress toward those goals will be determined; and
(F) that specifies how the grant funds and any other funds of the State are to be used to address needs and goals identified in the multiyear plan.
(c) Successive Year Grants.— 
A State shall be eligible for a grant under this subsection in a fiscal year succeeding the first fiscal year in which the State receives a grant under subsection (b) if the State
(1) certifies to the Secretary that an assessment or audit of the States highway safety data and traffic records system has been conducted or updated within the preceding 5 years;
(2) certifies to the Secretary that its highway safety data and traffic records coordinating committee continues to operate and supports the multiyear plan;
(3) specifies how the grant funds and any other funds of the State are to be used to address needs and goals identified in the multiyear plan;
(4) demonstrates to the Secretary measurable progress toward achieving the goals and objectives identified in the multiyear plan; and
(5) submits to the Secretary a current report on the progress in implementing the multiyear plan.
(d) Grant Amount.— 
Subject to subsection (e)(3), the amount of a year grant made to a State for a fiscal year under this section shall equal the higher of
(1) the amount determined by multiplying
(A) the amount appropriated to carry out this section for such fiscal year, by
(B) the ratio that the funds apportioned to the State under section 402 for fiscal year 2003 bears to the funds apportioned to all States under such section for fiscal year 2003; or
(2) 
(A) $300,000 in the case of the first fiscal year a grant is made to a State under this section after the date of enactment of this subparagraph; or
(B) $500,000 in the case of a succeeding fiscal year a grant is made to the State under this section after such date of enactment.
(e) Additional Requirements and Limitations.— 

(1) Model data elements.— 
The Secretary, in consultation with States and other appropriate parties, shall determine the model data elements that are useful for the observation and analysis of State and national trends in occurrences, rates, outcomes, and circumstances of motor vehicle traffic accidents. In order to be eligible for a grant under this section, a State shall submit to the Secretary a certification that the State has adopted and uses such model data elements, or a certification that the State will use grant funds provided under this section toward adopting and using the maximum number of such model data elements as soon as practicable.
(2) Data on use of electronic devices.— 
The model data elements required under paragraph (1) shall include data elements, as determined appropriate by the Secretary, in consultation with the States and appropriate elements of the law enforcement community, on the impact on traffic safety of the use of electronic devices while driving.
(3) Maintenance of effort.— 
No grant may be made to a State under this section in any fiscal year unless the State enters into such agreements with the Secretary as the Secretary may require to ensure that the State will maintain its aggregate expenditures from all other sources for highway safety data programs at or above the average level of such expenditures maintained by such State in the 2 fiscal years preceding the date of enactment of the SAFETEALU.
(4) Federal share.— 
The Federal share of the cost of adopting and implementing in a fiscal year a State program described in subsection (a) may not exceed 80 percent.
(5) Limitation on use of grant proceeds.— 
A State may use the proceeds of a grant received under this section only to implement the program described in subsection (a) for which the grant is made.
(f) Applicability of Chapter 1.— 
Section 402 (d) of this title shall apply in the administration of this section.

23 USC 409 - Discovery and admission as evidence of certain reports and surveys

Notwithstanding any other provision of law, reports, surveys, schedules, lists, or data compiled or collected for the purpose of identifying, evaluating, or planning the safety enhancement of potential accident sites, hazardous roadway conditions, or railway-highway crossings, pursuant to sections 130, 144, and 148 of this title or for the purpose of developing any highway safety construction improvement project which may be implemented utilizing Federal-aid highway funds shall not be subject to discovery or admitted into evidence in a Federal or State court proceeding or considered for other purposes in any action for damages arising from any occurrence at a location mentioned or addressed in such reports, surveys, schedules, lists, or data.

23 USC 410 - Alcohol-impaired driving countermeasures

(a) General Authority.— 

(1) Authority to make grants.— 
Subject to the requirements of this section, the Secretary shall make grants to States that adopt and implement effective programs to reduce traffic safety problems resulting from individuals driving while under the influence of alcohol. Such grants may only be used by recipient States to implement and enforce such programs.
(2) Maintenance of effort.— 
No grant may be made to a State under this subsection in any fiscal year unless the State enters into such agreements with the Secretary as the Secretary may require to ensure that the State will maintain its aggregate expenditures from all other sources for alcohol traffic safety programs at or above the average level of such expenditures in its 2 fiscal years preceding the date of enactment of the SAFETEALU.
(3) Federal share.— 
The Federal share of the cost of implementing and enforcing in a fiscal year a program adopted by a State pursuant to paragraph (1) shall not exceed
(A) in each of the first and second fiscal years in which the State receives a grant under this section, 75 percent;
(B) in each of the third and fourth fiscal years in which the State receives a grant under this section, 50 percent; and
(C) in each of the fifth, sixth, seventh, and eighth fiscal years in which the State receives a grant under this section, 25 percent.
(b) Eligibility Requirements.— 
To be eligible for a grant under subsection (a), a State shall
(1) have an alcohol related fatality rate of 0.5 or less per 100,000,000 vehicle miles traveled as of the date of the grant, as determined by the Secretary using the most recent Fatality Analysis Reporting System of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration; or
(2) 
(A) for fiscal year 2006 by carrying out 3 of the programs and activities under subsection (c);
(B) for fiscal year 2007 by carrying out 4 of the programs and activities under subsection (c); or
(C) for fiscal years 2008 and 2009 by carrying out 5 of the programs and activities under subsection (c).
(c) State Programs and Activities.— 
The programs and activities referred to in subsection (b) are the following:
(1) Check point, saturation patrol program.— 
A State program to conduct a series of high visibility, statewide law enforcement campaigns in which law enforcement personnel monitor for impaired driving, either through the use of sobriety check points or saturation patrols, on a nondiscriminatory, lawful basis for the purpose of determining whether the operators of the motor vehicles are driving while under the influence of alcohol
(A) if the State organizes the campaigns in cooperation with related periodic national campaigns organized by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, except that this subparagraph does not preclude a State from initiating sustained high visibility, Statewide law enforcement campaigns independently of the cooperative efforts; and
(B) if, for each fiscal year, the State demonstrates to the Secretary that the State and the political subdivisions of the State that receive funds under this section have increased, in the aggregate, the total number of impaired driving law enforcement activities at high incident locations (or any other similar activity approved by the Secretary) initiated in such State during the preceding fiscal year by a factor that the Secretary determines meaningful for the State over the number of such activities initiated in such State during the preceding fiscal year.
(2) Prosecution and adjudication outreach program.— 
A State prosecution and adjudication program under which
(A) the State works to reduce the use of diversion programs by educating and informing prosecutors and judges through various outreach methods about the benefits and merits of prosecuting and adjudicating defendants who repeatedly commit impaired driving offenses;
(B) the courts in a majority of the judicial jurisdictions of the State are monitored on the courts adjudication of cases of impaired driving offenses; or
(C) annual statewide outreach is provided for judges and prosecutors on innovative approaches to the prosecution and adjudication of cases of impaired driving offenses that have the potential for significantly improving the prosecution and adjudication of such cases.
(3) Testing of bac.— 
An effective system for increasing from the previous year the rate of blood alcohol concentration testing of motor vehicle drivers involved in fatal accidents.
(4) High risk drivers.— 
A law that establishes stronger sanctions or additional penalties for individuals convicted of operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol whose blood alcohol concentration is 0.15 percent or more than for individuals convicted of the same offense but with a lower blood alcohol concentration. For purposes of this paragraph, additional penalties includes
(A) a 1-year suspension of a drivers license, but with the individual whose license is suspended becoming eligible after 45 days of such suspension to obtain a provisional drivers license that would permit the individual to drive
(i) only to and from the individuals place of employment or school; and
(ii) only in an automobile equipped with a certified alcohol ignition interlock device; and
(B) a mandatory assessment by a certified substance abuse official of whether the individual has an alcohol abuse problem with possible referral to counseling if the official determines that such a referral is appropriate.
(5) Programs for effective alcohol rehabilitation and dwi courts.— 
A program for effective inpatient and outpatient alcohol rehabilitation based on mandatory assessment and appropriate treatment for repeat offenders or a program to refer impaired driving cases to courts that specialize in driving while impaired cases that emphasize the close supervision of high-risk offenders.
(6) Underage drinking program.— 
An effective strategy, as determined by the Secretary, for preventing operators of motor vehicles under age 21 from obtaining alcoholic beverages and for preventing persons from making alcoholic beverages available to individuals under age 21. Such a strategy may include
(A) the issuance of tamper-resistant drivers licenses to individuals under age 21 that are easily distinguishable in appearance from drivers licenses issued to individuals age 21 or older; and
(B) a program provided by a nonprofit organization for training point of sale personnel concerning, at a minimum
(i) the clinical effects of alcohol;
(ii) methods of preventing second party sales of alcohol;
(iii) recognizing signs of intoxication;
(iv) methods to prevent underage drinking; and
(v) Federal, State, and local laws that are relevant to such personnel; and
(C) having a law in effect that creates a 0.02 percent blood alcohol content limit for drivers under 21 years old.
(7) Administrative license revocation.— 
An administrative drivers license suspension or revocation system for individuals who operate motor vehicles while under the influence of alcohol that requires that
(A) in the case of an individual who, in any 5-year period beginning after the date of enactment of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century, is determined on the basis of a chemical test to have been operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol or is determined to have refused to submit to such a test as proposed by a law enforcement officer, the State agency responsible for administering drivers licenses, upon receipt of the report of the law enforcement officer
(i) suspend the drivers license of such individual for a period of not less than 90 days if such individual is a first offender in such 5-year period; except that under such suspension an individual may operate a motor vehicle, after the 15-day period beginning on the date of the suspension, to and from employment, school, or an alcohol treatment program if an ignition interlock device is installed on each of the motor vehicles owned or operated, or both, by the individual; and
(ii) suspend the drivers license of such individual for a period of not less than 1 year, or revoke such license, if such individual is a repeat offender in such 5year period; except that such individual to operate a motor vehicle, after the 45-day period beginning on the date of the suspension or revocation, to and from employment, school, or an alcohol treatment program if an ignition interlock device is installed on each of the motor vehicles owned or operated, or both, by the individual; and
(B) the suspension and revocation referred to under clause (i) take effect not later than 30 days after the date on which the individual refused to submit to a chemical test or received notice of having been determined to be driving under the influence of alcohol, in accordance with the procedures of the State.
(8) Self sustaining impaired driving prevention program.— 
A program under which a significant portion of the fines or surcharges collected from individuals who are fined for operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol are returned to communities for comprehensive programs for the prevention of impaired driving.
(d) Uses of Grants.— 
Subject to subsection (g)(2), grants made under this section may be used for all programs and activities described in subsection (c), and to defray the following costs:
(1) Labor costs, management costs, and equipment procurement costs for the high visibility, Statewide law enforcement campaigns under subsection (c)(1).
(2) The costs of the training of law enforcement personnel and the procurement of technology and equipment, including video equipment and passive alcohol sensors, to counter directly impaired operation of motor vehicles.
(3) The costs of public awareness, advertising, and educational campaigns that publicize use of sobriety check points or increased law enforcement efforts to counter impaired operation of motor vehicles.
(4) The costs of public awareness, advertising, and educational campaigns that target impaired operation of motor vehicles by persons under 34 years of age.
(5) The costs of the development and implementation of a State impaired operator information system.
(6) The costs of operating programs that result in vehicle forfeiture or impoundment or license plate impoundment.
(e) Additional Authorities for Certain Authorized Uses.— 

(1) Combination of grant proceeds.— 
Grant funds used for a campaign under subsection (d)(3) may be combined, or expended in coordination, with proceeds of grants under section 402.
(2) Coordination of uses.— 
Grant funds used for a campaign under paragraph (3) or (4) of subsection (d) may be expended
(A) in coordination with employers, schools, entities in the hospitality industry, and nonprofit traffic safety groups; and
(B) in coordination with sporting events and concerts and other entertainment events.
(f) Allocation.— 
Subject to subsection (g), funds made available to carry out this section shall be allocated among States that meet the eligibility criteria in subsection (b) on the basis of the apportionment formula under section 402 (c).
(g) Grants to High Fatality Rate States.— 

(1) In general.— 
The Secretary shall make a separate grant under this section to each State that
(A) is among the 10 States with the highest impaired driving related fatalities as determined by the Secretary using the most recent Fatality Analysis Reporting System of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration; and
(B) prepares a plan for grant expenditures under this subsection that is approved by the Administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
(2) Required uses.— 
At least one-half of the amounts allocated to States under this subsection may only be used for the program described in subsection (c)(1).
(3) Allocation.— 
Funds made available under this subsection shall be allocated among States described in paragraph (1) on the basis of the apportionment formula under section 402 (c), except that no State shall be allocated more than 30 percent of the funds made available to carry out this subsection for a fiscal year.
(4) Funding.— 
Not more than 15 percent per fiscal year of amounts made available to carry out this section for a fiscal year shall be made available by the Secretary for making grants under this subsection.
(h) Applicability of Chapter 1.— 
The provisions contained in section 402 (d) shall apply to this section.
(i) Definitions.— 
In this section, the following definitions apply:
(1) Alcoholic beverage.— 
The term alcoholic beverage has the meaning given such term in section 158 (c).
(2) Controlled substances.— 
The term controlled substances has the meaning given such term in section 102(6) of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 802 (6)).
(3) Motor vehicle.— 
The term motor vehicle has the meaning given such term in section 405.
(4) Impaired operator.— 
The term impaired operator means a person who, while operating a motor vehicle
(A) has a blood alcohol content of 0.08 percent or higher; or
(B) is under the influence of a controlled substance.
(5) Impaired driving related fatality rate.— 
The term impaired driving related fatality rate means the rate of alcohol related fatalities, as calculated in accordance with regulations which the Administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration shall prescribe.

23 USC 411 - State highway safety data improvements

(a) General Authority.— 

(1) Authority to make grants.— 
Subject to the requirements of this section, the Secretary shall make grants to States that adopt and implement effective programs
(A) to improve the timeliness, accuracy, completeness, uniformity, and accessibility of the data of the State that is needed to identify priorities for national, State, and local highway and traffic safety programs;
(B) to evaluate the effectiveness of efforts to make such improvements;
(C) to link these State data systems, including traffic records, with other data systems within the State, such as systems that contain medical and economic data; and
(D) to improve the compatibility of the data system of the State with national data systems and data systems of other States and to enhance the ability of the Secretary to observe and analyze national trends in crash occurrences, rates, outcomes, and circumstances.

Such grants may be used by recipient States only to implement such programs.

(2) Model data elements.— 
The Secretary, in consultation with States and other appropriate parties, shall determine the model data elements necessary to observe and analyze national trends in crash occurrences, rates, outcomes, and circumstances. In order to become eligible for a grant under this section, a State shall demonstrate how the multiyear highway safety data and traffic records plan of the State described in subsection (b)(1) will be incorporated into data systems of the State.
(3) Maintenance of effort.— 
No grant may be made to a State under this section in any fiscal year unless the State enters into such agreements with the Secretary as the Secretary may require to ensure that the State will maintain its aggregate expenditures from all other sources for highway safety data programs at or above the average level of such expenditures in its 2 fiscal years preceding the date of enactment of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century.
(4) Maximum period of eligibility.— 
No State may receive grants under this section in more than 6 fiscal years beginning after September 30, 1997.
(5) Federal share.— 
The Federal share of the cost of implementing and enforcing, as appropriate, in a fiscal year a program adopted by a State pursuant to paragraph (1) shall not exceed
(A) in the first and second fiscal years in which the State receives a grant under this section, 75 percent;
(B) in the third and fourth fiscal years in which the State receives a grant under this section, 50 percent; and
(C) in the fifth and sixth fiscal years in which the State receives a grant under this section, 25 percent.
(b) First-Year Grants.— 

(1) Eligibility.— 
A State shall become eligible for a first-year grant under this subsection in a fiscal year if the State either
(A) demonstrates, to the satisfaction of the Secretary, that the State has
(i) established a highway safety data and traffic records coordinating committee with a multidisciplinary membership, including the administrators, collectors, and users of such data (including the public health, injury control, and motor carrier communities);
(ii) completed, within the preceding 5 years, a highway safety data and traffic records assessment or an audit of the highway safety data and traffic records system of the State; and
(iii) initiated the development of a multiyear highway safety data and traffic records strategic plan that
(I) identifies and prioritizes the highway safety data and traffic records needs and goals of the State;
(II) identifies performance-based measures by which progress toward those goals will be determined; and
(III) will be submitted to the highway safety data and traffic records coordinating committee of the State for approval; or
(B) provides, to the satisfaction of the Secretary
(i) a certification that the State has met the requirements of clauses (i) and (ii) of subparagraph (A);
(ii) a multiyear highway safety data and traffic records strategic plan that
(I) meets the requirements of subparagraph (A)(iii); and
(II) specifies how the incentive funds of the State for the fiscal year will be used to address needs and goals identified in the plan; and
(iii) a certification that the highway safety data and traffic records coordinating committee of the State continues to operate and supports the multiyear plan described in clause (ii).
(2) Grant amounts.— 
The amount of a first-year grant made to a State for a fiscal year under this subsection shall equal
(A) if the State is eligible for the grant under paragraph (1)(A), $125,000; and
(B) if the State is eligible for the grant under paragraph (1)(B), an amount determined by multiplying
(i) the amount appropriated to carry out this section for such fiscal year; by
(ii) the ratio that the funds apportioned to the State under section 402 for fiscal year 1997 bears to the funds apportioned to all States under section 402 for fiscal year 1997; except that no State eligible for a grant under paragraph (1)(B) shall receive less than $250,000.
(3) States not meeting criteria.— 
The Secretary may award a grant of up to $25,000 for 1 year to any State that does not meet the criteria established in paragraph (1). The grant may only be used to conduct activities needed to enable the State to qualify for a first-year grant in the next fiscal year.
(c) [1] Succeeding Year Grants.
(1) Eligibility.— 
A State shall be eligible for a grant under this subsection in a fiscal year succeeding the first fiscal year in which the State receives a grant under subsection (b) if the State, to the satisfaction of the Secretary
(A) submits or updates a multiyear highway safety data and traffic records strategic plan that meets the requirements of subsection (b)(1);
(B) certifies that the highway safety data and traffic records coordinating committee of the State continues to operate and supports the multiyear plan; and
(C) reports annually on the progress of the State in implementing the multiyear plan.
(2) Grant amounts.— 
The amount of a succeeding year grant made to the State for a fiscal year under this paragraph shall equal the amount determined by multiplying
(A) the amount appropriated to carry out this section for such fiscal year; by
(B) the ratio that the funds apportioned to the State under section 402 for fiscal year 1997 bears to the funds apportioned to all States under section 402 for fiscal year 1997; except that no State eligible for a grant under this paragraph shall receive less than $225,000.
(c) [1] Administrative Expenses.Funds authorized to be appropriated to carry out this section in a fiscal year shall be subject to a deduction not to exceed 5 percent for the necessary costs of administering the provisions of this section.
(d) Applicability of Chapter 1.— 
The provisions contained in section 402 (d) shall apply to this section.
[1] So in original. Two subsecs. (c) have been enacted.

23 USC 412 - Agency accountability

(a) Triennial State Management Reviews.— 
At least once every 3 years the Secretary shall conduct a review of each State highway safety program. The review shall include a management evaluation of all grant programs funded under this chapter. The Secretary shall provide review-based recommendations on how each State could improve the management and oversight of its grant activities and may provide a management and oversight plan for such grant programs.
(b) Recommendations Before Submission.— 
In order to provide guidance to State highway safety agencies on matters that should be addressed in the goals and initiatives of the State highway safety program before the program is submitted for review, the Secretary shall provide data-based recommendations to each State at least 90 days before the date on which the program is to be submitted for approval.
(c) State Program Review.— 
The Secretary shall
(1) conduct a program improvement review of a highway safety program under this chapter of a State that does not make substantial progress over a 3-year period in meeting its priority program goals; and
(2) provide technical assistance and safety program requirements to be incorporated in the State highway safety program for any goal not achieved.
(d) Regional Harmonization.— 
The Secretary and the Inspector General of the Department of Transportation shall undertake an administrative review of the practices and procedures of the management reviews and program reviews of State highway safety programs under this chapter conducted by the regional offices of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and prepare a written report of best practices and procedures for use by the regional offices in conducting such reviews. The report shall be completed within 180 days after the date of enactment of this section.
(e) Best Practices Guidelines.— 

(1) Uniform guidelines.— 
The Secretary shall issue uniform management review guidelines and program review guidelines based on the report under subsection (d). Each regional office shall use the guidelines in executing its State administrative review duties under this section.
(2) Publication.— 
The Secretary shall make publicly available on the Web site (or successor electronic facility) of the Administration the following documents upon their completion:
(A) The Secretarys management review guidelines and program review guidelines.
(B) All State highway safety programs submitted under this chapter.
(C) State annual accomplishment reports.
(D) The Administrations Summary Report of findings from Management Reviews and Improvement Plans.
(3) Reports to state highway safety agencies.— 
The Secretary may not make publicly available a program, report, or review under paragraph (2) that is directed to a State highway safety agency until after the date on which the program, report, or review is submitted to that agency under this chapter.
(f) GAO Review.— 

(1) Analysis.— 
The Comptroller General shall analyze the effectiveness of the Administrations oversight of traffic safety grants under this chapter by determining the usefulness of the Administrations advice to the States regarding administration and State activities under this chapter, the extent to which the States incorporate the Administrations recommendations into their highway safety programs, and the improvements that result in a States highway safety program that may be attributable to the Administrations recommendations.
(2) Report.— 
Not later than September 30, 2008, the Comptroller General shall submit a report on the results of the analysis to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate.